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RASPBERRY PI
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Read about it in various columns a few months back, finally had a go on a Rasberry Pi yesterday. What a great bit of kit and £75 is such a bargain to get you into coding.

Although I'd only managed to do very basic functions at the end of the go, I'm now really craving one as it'd be great to be fluent in coding.

Anyone else had a play on one?

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Cheers,
James

it'd be great to be fluent in coding

Why? It's not like in the movies you know...

No one's ever given me a blowjob while I manually cracked a 128bit encryption...

And "being fluent in coding" is akin to saying "being fluent in language" - there are 100s of coding languages out there. Although a good, basic grounding in C will serve any programmer well in the future (IMO).

Wanting to code "for fun" is like people who wear ties "casually" I.e. If you had to do it day in, day out as a job, doing it in your spare time seems less appealing...

If you want to learn to code, you don't need a Pi, you can do it on any computer you already own (and probably a lot more easily than on a Pi).

Happy Xmas ;)

I have one. I've only got the OS up and running so far due to lack of time. They're £25 + VAT, plus another £5 for a case. Most likely you'll already have a USB charger that can act as a PSU, ditto keyboards, mouse and other bits and pieces. For the money they are great. But if you have an old PC a simple Linux install could be just as useful from a learning POV

PugRallye2 said...

it'd be great to be fluent in coding

Why? It's not like in the movies you know...

No one's ever given me a blowjob while I manually cracked a 128bit encryption...

You're DIW :D

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Knackered old hairdresser's sh1tter

TwinTurbot said...

Although I'd only managed to do very basic functions at the end of the go, I'm now really craving one as it'd be great to be fluent in coding.

And before long you too could be trying to extinguish any enthusiasm others have for the industry (see above)

I've not seen one, but I think they're a great idea for people who otherwise don't have access to a PC

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AmperaWomenCar Trade

They're a great educational tool. The nipper reckons it really boosted his ICT grade.
Otherwise : they're slow, even overclocked to 1000mhz with the new build, and you can get scripting tools and UNIX emulators for PCs.
Cheap if you have compatible bits.

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Knackered old hairdresser's sh1tter

I'd far rather have a raspberry pie. :D

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Entirely pointless

PugRallye2 said...

it'd be great to be fluent in coding

Why? It's not like in the movies you know...

No one's ever given me a blowjob while I manually cracked a 128bit encryption...

And "being fluent in coding" is akin to saying "being fluent in language" - there are 100s of coding languages out there. Although a good, basic grounding in C will serve any programmer well in the future (IMO).

Wanting to code "for fun" is like people who wear ties "casually" I.e. If you had to do it day in, day out as a job, doing it in your spare time seems less appealing...

If you want to learn to code, you don't need a Pi, you can do it on any computer you already own (and probably a lot more easily than on a Pi).

Happy Xmas ;)

This is what happens if you choose to become a programmer.

Dead inside, just like the rest of them :lol:

;)

Updated December 27, 2012 at 10:49 PM

The "coding" you do on a raspberry pi is no different to what you do on anything else - although I can see the appeal for teaching kids and keeping them away from cocking up anything important. The more interesting raspberry pi projects effectively use them as a beefy but cheap microcontroller rather than a computer.

codeacademy.com is great for learning just from your browser, no small underpowered PC required.

I'm doing codeacademy - great fun but man, I am bad at this stuff.

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Bunta's Tofu

Bunta said...

I'm doing codeacademy - great fun but man, I am bad at this stuff.

Me too. I occasionally have problems with the console though, it can be quite flaky. I was doing the Ruby module yesterday and pressing the "Run" button wasn't doing anything on some of the exercises.

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What's the difference between a BMW and a hedgehog?

Si_ said...

The nipper reckons it really boosted his ICT grade.

Yep, thanks to the RasPi he can now use Excel and suggest why it's a good idea to have anti-virus with the best of them.

With all these nippers having Raspberry Pi's, they may well end up earning sh!t-loads in IT, have hallway TV's, etc, etc ;)

RichardMajor86 said...

Si_ said...

The nipper reckons it really boosted his ICT grade.

Yep, thanks to the RasPi he can now use Excel and suggest why it's a good idea to have anti-virus with the best of them.

Actually he was able to identify what individual components within a computer do, and why it needs a OS, but thanks for your valuable contribution.

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Knackered old hairdresser's sh1tter

I did computer studies at uni.

We learned c++

If that's fun then I most deffo don't get it.

Fair play to those that find it interesting I found it tedious and frustrating.

Si_ said...

RichardMajor86 said...

Si_ said...

The nipper reckons it really boosted his ICT grade.

Yep, thanks to the RasPi he can now use Excel and suggest why it's a good idea to have anti-virus with the best of them.

Actually he was able to identify what individual components within a computer do, and why it needs a OS, but thanks for your valuable contribution.

To be fair, this is fvck all to do with the current educational format.

Mind you, using a computer for more than fifteen minutes in anger with a blind sheet of 'what the hell is going on here' will teach you that.

The difference is that Linux will actually tell you what the problem is if you ask it (nee TOP) whereas Windows will just grind to a halt and tell you that you have a GPU score of 3.4....

Updated December 28, 2012 at 11:35 PM

Si_ said...

RichardMajor86 said...

Si_ said...

The nipper reckons it really boosted his ICT grade.

Yep, thanks to the RasPi he can now use Excel and suggest why it's a good idea to have anti-virus with the best of them.

Actually he was able to identify what individual components within a computer do, and why it needs a OS, but thanks for your valuable contribution.

I'm not sure how the RasPi helped him identify these parts, and taught him that he needed an OS, anymore than someone just telling him. However, top marks to him.

IT at school is a joke. Although the new computing idea they are bringing in sounds amazing, and genuinely helpful. Kids will be leaving school with an understanding of programming, and how to start building their own apps - the building blocks of our modern world. I WISH i was taught that at school.

Thanks to my IT GCSE i am able to identify the 'mouse' on a picture of a computer, and tell you what it does. I can also tell you why you have to type in a password twice when you create a new one.


It's called "parenting".

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Knackered old hairdresser's sh1tter

To me the only thing cool about programming is when the thing finally runs like we want after hours searching and fixing the problems. And I've never done anything complex. The rest of the time is just boredom, frustration and rage.

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