Forums > General > FAO Runners

FAO RUNNERS
Previous | 12 | Next

Afternoon all. I've decided today to run the Liverpool half marathon on March 17th, I need a bit of advice before obviously running the marathon itself.

Firstly, where is the best place to buy a pair of running shoes and are there any brands I should avoid?

Secondly and a bit more pertinently, what should I do diet wise? I know it's a bit specific but my diet has been geared towards bulking at the gym for the past 18 months, so it's probably not ideal for marathon training.

--

Stolen Orions on fire off the hard shoulder of the M8. I watched neds litter in the dark near the Tennents shop. All those... moments... will be lost in time, like [coughs] tears... in... rain. Time... to die...

Well done! I may yet decide to sign up for a Half in March.

I'd say it's all about stamina. Wouldn't worry too much about the diet. Just get out there and practice, building it up gradually. Suggest aiming for a 10k run about a month or so ahead of the half as well.

--

Do the wet foot test to see whether you pronate or supinate before buying shoes.
I'd say get specialist help as a halfie is a long way. I tried loads on before I found a pair I got on with (Adidas without arch support). Others swear by Brookes Beasts or Asics Gel - it all depends upon your foot shape and your gait.

I'm no runner, but that's my experience. If you can afford it, see a specialist.

--

Knackered old hairdresser's sh1tter

I was talking about this the other day with one of the PT's at the gym.
He suggested looking at this type of training to maintain a good frame

I am giving the Brighton marathon some thought for 2014. I think this is my last season playing rugby at this level so need another challenge. Just unsure if my knees and ankle can hold.

--

How are you doing? Is you good becos' I want to know.

Thanks for the help guys, I went out for a run today from Old Colwyn to Rhos on Sea. There and back it's about 7k and it half killed me but I've got over 3 months to build things up thankfully.

I'll do the wet foot test and go to a reputable running shop in Liverpool to find which running shoe is best. The last pair of proper running shoes were by Reebok and they were very comfortable. Slightly worried as I've badly sprained both my ankles, one last year and the other about 12 years ago, both occasionally play up but I do have ankle supports which should help. :)

--

Stolen Orions on fire off the hard shoulder of the M8. I watched neds litter in the dark near the Tennents shop. All those... moments... will be lost in time, like [coughs] tears... in... rain. Time... to die...

My only advise regarding running shoes is don't get hung up on brand names. If a Reebok fits you better than a Brookes, then get the Reebok. Common sense I know, but so many people think the shoe will 'adapt' to their foot.

No.

If it aint comfortable in the shop, it's only going to get worse.

As for running. Build up slowly & have plenty of rest days. Listen to your body, even if it means having a weeks rest. Chances are after that rest you'll run a PB even if you think you're trudging along.

Run in the rain. It's awesome.

Best of luck!

--

Cheers,

Gwaredd

steelesigns.co.uk

If you've been bulking up then your diet wants to change quite a lot, you'll be needing to cut the protein down and eat a lot more carbs.

Meals before a big run or session you need (IIRC) 70/30 carb/protein.

After a hard or long session, the first thing you need are some simple carbs. I like the post workout drinks like SiS ReGo or for goodnes shakes. Then your meal should be 50/50 carbs/protein.

If you get up to a good weekly mileage, you'll find yourself dying for huge plates of whole meal pasta :D

--

Large format print & graphics

Can't comment on the diet but do get fitted as the best brand is very specific - I wear Mizuno as the nike, Adidas, Assics in my price range were not as good.

Oh and make sure you get them plenty big - 1/2 to 1 size bigger than you usually wear.

--

and from the beginning think what may be the end.

Running shoes is a real maze - you can spend £50 or £150 on what looks to be exactly the same shoe. In my opinion (and I run about 100miles a month) - you just need a simple shoe that you find comfortable. All this support / motion control / stability shoe stuff is just helping you run in the wrong way (in my opinion). Get some 'neutral' shoes (I use New Balance) and try and be gentle as you run. You shouldn't be able to hear your steps (until you get really tired and start to plod.

Diet-wise - there's no 'one way' just keep it simple, fresh foods, lots of veg and fruit. Wholemeal rice and grains etc. Running for an hour burns around 1000 calories (for me) - so don't over compensate and overeat.

Once you are running more than 45mins you might want to take a snack with you - a gel, an energy drink, breakfast bar, jelly babies - just to give you a lift and an energy hit to get to the end.

Finally - keep hydrated - make sure you drink some water when you get back, at least 250ml to 500ml. You will lose fluid when you run (and salt as a side-effect) so make sure you replenish.

There are plenty of half-marathon plans out there on the internet - but I wouldn't take them too seriously; just run - a lot. If you are running 3 times a week (a tempo run - i.e. at race pace, for maybe 30-40% of the distance, a recovery run (30-40 mins at a moderate pace) and a long-slow-run (70-80% distance at an easy pace) - you will be sound.

Most of all - enjoy it!

I've been eating a lot of chicken for the past 18 months, fresh of course. But I've switched in that time to wholemeal bread, rice and pasta so I'm part way there with the diet. I could do with eating a touch more fruit and veg though.

A couple of friends have recommended Up and Running in Liverpool to get sorted with running shoes. They do a gait analysis for free so that'll determine what type of shoe is best.

Also, is there some kind of app I can download to measure time and distance for the ipod touch or do I need to buy a pedometer?

--

Stolen Orions on fire off the hard shoulder of the M8. I watched neds litter in the dark near the Tennents shop. All those... moments... will be lost in time, like [coughs] tears... in... rain. Time... to die...

Try Run Zombie run - great running app!

Up and Running will do a free gait analysis prior to any shoe purchase (I think it's something like £10 otherwise). Also - WalkJogRun is a great site - though a little demoralising when you map it out and the 6 miles you think you've done in your head turns out to be more like 3 :lol: . For the best though if you're training.

If you have an Android phone (can't vouch for iThings), My Tracks is a great app - though once you have a GPS fix, turn mobile data off so your location doesn't bounce from mast-to-mast as you go, producing anomalous results.

--

MarDoubleT

"Horsepower sells cars, torque wins races."

Half the evidence shows that proper fitted shoes reduces injuries but the other half of the evidence shows that proper fitted shoes make no difference to injury rates.

Personally I had some fitted about 7-8 years ago and I've stuck to the same brand/model since then even when buying new pairs. I've not had any issues but then again I don't run that often (peak maybe 15 miles a week).

Currently I only tend to run short distances at pace but I tend to use Innov8 trail shoes so more the barefoot style of shoe and again I've not had any issues. The first time I wore them for more than a mile or so I did 10km and felt fine once my legs started moving again the following day. Seems they do cause different muscles to be used.

_CC_ said...

I am giving the Brighton marathon some thought for 2014. I think this is my last season playing rugby at this level so need another challenge. Just unsure if my knees and ankle can hold.

If you are strong and have good cardio capability then try something like this London Throwdown Crossfit compeition
It's a very competitive environment and gets you very fit training for it 8)

Assuming you're not massively overweight, you should find completing a half easy enough with a few runs under your belt. Doing it quickly is a different matter.

I've been reading about running myself a bit recently, and the one piece of advice that everyone seems to give is RUN SLOWER. Go at a gentle pace where you could easily hold a conversation if needed, and gradually up the miles.

I've never run more than 6 miles in my life (and only done that once, normally doing 3-4), but I took the slow advice and dropped my pace the other day, and ran 10 miles straight off the bat. Took me 1hr31, so wasn't particularly blistering pace, but I feel I could have carried on and done the half marathon distance if I'd wanted to.

Note I ignored my own advice and didn't up the distance gradually. I don't seem to have injured myself, but that's the most common downfall of new runners. Running too far too soon.

I'd aim to run 2-4 times a week, with 1 of them being 50% longer than the others. Start at distances you're comfortably with, and build them up gradually.

I was reading that the changes that happen to you aerobically are mainly chemical so they can happen relatively quickly in the body and you soon become used to running for 20-30-40 minutes. However the changes to your legs are muscular and this takes much longer to happen. Hence why people tend to pick up the time/distance quickly and cause injuries (shin splints seem to be common).

Not sure a pair of fitted trainers is going to solve this issue.

I went to Run4it where they stick you on a running machine to see how you run then recommend shoes to suit. I got Brookes, my wife has had Mizuna, Adidias and Nike and she runs more then me.

I have done a couple of halfs, Amsterdam and GNR. Neither to get a good time. For training I worked up to about 8 miles. I should have worked up to 10 or so a couple of weekends before but I am lazy. As to diet I ate a lot of pasta the night before.

Don't get silly as I am assuming you are doing it, like I did, as an experience rather than to get 90 minute times?

Cycling builds up your leg muscles far more effectively than running itself which will strip away muscle that you don't need so if you have been nuilding yourself up then running will trim you a fair bit unless you continue high protein diet and gym visits on top of the running.

Best of luck, can't speak for the one you have signed up for but both mine the atmosphere was brilliant. :)

Hi, I race road bikes (30 races last year!) and have done the odd half marathon.

Diet, believe it or not for endurance sports you still need to pack in the protein, depending how much you train. Your muscles still need to recover and build back so protein needed - after your training runs. As 'The Little Egg' said pre run you need carbs. Fruit and veg to boost your nutrition and immune system go without say.

If you want to be fast you prob have to lose some of the muscle mass I assume you have (from gym’ing it). Look at the Brown Lee brothers, Paula Radcliff or Bradley Wiggins!). There’s a certain weight you have to be to be fast (sub 70kg).

DK

--

www.nitroaddiction.co.uk

I'd like to run a reasonably quick time but I'm not bothered about doing a stupidly quick time. It's more for getting fitter/ healthier and to raise a bit of cash for charity as well.

I'll still be going to to the gym 3/4 times a week on top of running as well. I'll run to the gym instead of taking the car though, makes sense as it's 2.5 mile to the gym so about 8k there and back. I'll do parts of the half route and gradually build up going further and further till I can do the whole route.

--

Stolen Orions on fire off the hard shoulder of the M8. I watched neds litter in the dark near the Tennents shop. All those... moments... will be lost in time, like [coughs] tears... in... rain. Time... to die...

Doctor Turbo said...

Hi, I race road bikes (30 races last year!) and have done the odd half marathon.

Diet, believe it or not for endurance sports you still need to pack in the protein, depending how much you train. Your muscles still need to recover and build back so protein needed - after your training runs. As 'The Little Egg' said pre run you need carbs. Fruit and veg to boost your nutrition and immune system go without say.

If you want to be fast you prob have to lose some of the muscle mass I assume you have (from gym’ing it). Look at the Brown Lee brothers, Paula Radcliff or Bradley Wiggins!). There’s a certain weight you have to be to be fast (sub 70kg).

DK

Absolutely agree. Big misconception among many of my patients is that protein is for strength athletes and carbs are for distance athletes. You'll need just as much protein for long running as you did for weights training (as long as you weren't going ridiculously overboard when you were bulking) for recovery. Tiny professional runners/cyclists would have 3 or 4 times the protein of average (much larger) people. Easiest/simplest rule to remember re carbs - immediately prior, during, and post-runs = simple carbs, and the longer the time gets before and after the session, have more complex carbs.

Shoes - go somewhere they'll put you on a treadmill to test for what sort of fit you need, and don't be bullied into buying an expensive pair that feels uncomfortable!

Cheers and good luck!!!

Previous | 12 | Next

Jump to forum: Go

Please contact the webmaster if you have any problems or queries relating to this forum.

MEMBER LOGIN

|
Connect
Company Website | Media Information | Contact Us | Privacy Notice | Subs Info | Affiliate Programme
Our Other Websites: The Week | Auto Express | Custom PC | IT Pro | MacUser | Men's Fitness | Micro Mart | PC Pro | bit-tech | Know Your Mobile | Octane | Expert Reviews | Channel Pro | Know Your Cell | Know Your Mobile India | Digital SLR Photography | Den of Geek | Magazines | Computer Shopper | Mobile Phone Deals | Competitions | Cyclist | Health & Fitness | CarBuyer | Cloud Pro | MagBooks | Mobile Test | Land Rover Monthly | Webuser | Computer Active | Table Pouncer | Viva Celular