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SUPERCARS: NISSAN GT-R ON NAT GEO
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It was on at 7pm (or just started on Nat Geo+1 :lol: ) and will be repeated at 8am on Wednesday and 11am on Thursday.

Great updated programme following the excellent one they did after the car was launched.
Some odd sections where they appear to have dubbed a Ferrari's soundtrack over the VR38 though... :?

It confirmed what I was told though, that every GT-R is scrupulously thrashed by a test driver up 7k rpm and up to 100mph on a test circuit after assembly. So why bother with all the namby pamby running in procedure that Nissan print in their handbook?

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Watched it, entertaining program, however I was lolz'ing at teh downforce ;)

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A yellow loltus

David_Yu said...

It confirmed what I was told though, that every GT-R is scrupulously thrashed by a test driver up 7k rpm and up to 100mph on a test circuit after assembly. So why bother with all the namby pamby running in procedure that Nissan print in their handbook

Exactly what I said to my father.

N said...

David_Yu said...

It confirmed what I was told though, that every GT-R is scrupulously thrashed by a test driver up 7k rpm and up to 100mph on a test circuit after assembly. So why bother with all the namby pamby running in procedure that Nissan print in their handbook

Exactly what I said to my father.

Has he bought one? Porsche and Ferraris are bench run and test driven too, so again, why bother with running-in? Especially as most Ferraris don't exceed the running-in mileage in their first year...

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David_Yu said...

Has he bought one?

I wish

David_Yu said...

Porsche and Ferraris are bench run and test driven too, so again, why bother with running-in? Especially as most Ferraris don't exceed the running-in mileage in their first year...

The F430 and 599 GTB user manuals only ask for a "1000 km (620 mi.)" run-in, limiting rev to 5000 rpm (I suppose it should be the same for other recent Ferraris).

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Pilouil
Citroen C3 1.4 HDI 69.0424 bhp

And since when could a complicated Fiesta be considered as a supercar?

:lol: (just joking)

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Pilouil
Citroen C3 1.4 HDI 69.0424 bhp

pilouil said...

David_Yu said...

Porsche and Ferraris are bench run and test driven too, so again, why bother with running-in? Especially as most Ferraris don't exceed the running-in mileage in their first year...

The F430 and 599 GTB user manuals only ask for a "1000 km (620 mi.)" run-in, limiting rev to 5000 rpm (I suppose it should be the same for other recent Ferraris).

Exactly, which I never bothered doing with my F430. The test drivers thrash the nuts off them on the roads around Maranello, so keeping it below 5k for 1000kms is a complete waste of time.

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I was thinking you assumed a longer run-in - most Ferrari exceed 1000 km in their first year I guess.

Anyway I can't buy new, so I don't have to ask myself ;)

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Pilouil
Citroen C3 1.4 HDI 69.0424 bhp

Even regular cars which are not exotic have their engine put on a dyno and revved like nuts to check they work properly.

I do remember on a discovery show or something where they said the break in period is mainly to stop people cruising at a constant high speed on the motorway such as at 100 mph as that is what is bad for a new engine whereas revving it is fine. Just high rpm for a constant speed = bad, so tell people to drive slowly to avoid that problem.

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How about not having a sig at all?

Normal cars the engine is built, the engine is stuffed up, fluids added and then at the end of the line a rolling road test is done, thrashing the car through the gears.

Thrashing a car for a couple of minutes and thrashing them for the first thousand miles are massively hugely enormously different.

Dave!

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I came here to drink milk and kick ass..... and i've just finished my milk!!!!

GraniteV8 said...

Thrashing a car for a couple of minutes and thrashing them for the first thousand miles are massively hugely enormously different.

Dave!

This.

This is my engine on the dyno at 8500 rpm.

It has come straight off the build bench, been loaded onto the dyno and then run for a 3 hour load cycle (where the dyno runs the engine at various rpm and load cycles to bed it in).

After this, it is then run at full load at each 500 rpm point for 5-10s to complete the full load mapping. Once this has been done and despite the above, it still needs to have the bedding in process finished on the road for a further 6-700 miles....

Updated November 27, 2012 at 12:11 PM

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Nordschleife - there's only two barriers to worry about - the ones on the left and the ones on the right!

There is something about red hot car bits that makes me go all funny at the knees...


Anyone got that pic of the Zonda tail pipes burning bright purple after Andy Wallace maxed it? That used to give me a right se....never mind. :oops:

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Bunta's Tofu

It always makes me wonder how close they are to melting and just dripping off... :lol:

So what wear does the first thousand miles of road use do that the revving the nuts off on dyno and test track doesn't?
And how come no manufacturers recommend oil changes after running in if that much wearing in has taken place?

(I always change it after the first 1000-1500 miles anyway as it's cheap to do and makes me feel better.)

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David_Yu said...

It always makes me wonder how close they are to melting and just dripping off... :lol:

So what wear does the first thousand miles of road use do that the revving the nuts off on dyno and test track doesn't?
And how come no manufacturers recommend oil changes after running in if that much wearing in has taken place?

(I always change it after the first 1000-1500 miles anyway as it's cheap to do and makes me feel better.)

On the road, you tend to be driving at particular load points for prolonged periods, on the above picture, you're only at any particular load site for a few seconds at a time, so it doesn't cause any damage. However, because the engine is still very "tight", if you did load it heavily for a prolonged period, it can result in a heat build up, from the friction and subsequent material expansion and cause it to "nip" up or wear more aggressively that particular area. Bedding it in properly means that the contact points have a chance to "wear" together to the correct tolerances :).

Regarding the running in process, LOTS do (in fact BMW won't warranty an M engine if it doesn't have the required 1200 mile oil and filter change (as I believe they use a low grade bedding in oil, which you obviously don't want to use for prolonged periods).

Updated November 27, 2012 at 1:33 PM

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Nordschleife - there's only two barriers to worry about - the ones on the left and the ones on the right!

David_Yu said...

And how come no manufacturers recommend oil changes after running in if that much wearing in has taken place?

(I always change it after the first 1000-1500 miles anyway as it's cheap to do and makes me feel better.)

BMW M division

it must be important if BMW invalidate your warranty if you miss the 1200 mile running service.

The BMW M Division will inval...

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How about not having a sig at all?

Mike Rainbird said...

GraniteV8 said...

Thrashing a car for a couple of minutes and thrashing them for the first thousand miles are massively hugely enormously different.

Dave!

This.

This is my engine on the dyno at 8500 rpm.

It has come straight off the build bench, been loaded onto the dyno and then run for a 3 hour load cycle (where the dyno runs the engine at various rpm and load cycles to bed it in).

After this, it is then run at full load at each 500 rpm point for 5-10s to complete the full load mapping. Once this has been done and despite the above, it still needs to have the bedding in process finished on the road for a further 6-700 miles....

We used to do exactly that on our test benches, prove that the engine actually does what it was designed to do and then do a set load and speed at set times for the next day to actually run the engine in.

We do the same on ships, get it to full load in 4 hours, check everything is running right and then reccomend varying loads while the engine is running in for the first 50 hours or so.

Dave!

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I came here to drink milk and kick ass..... and i've just finished my milk!!!!

To be honest, I have always varied the revs/gears and loads when running new cars in. It just seems frustrating to never venture beyond, say, 4,500rpm when the engine has already done far more.

GT-R was the easiest as if you leave it in Auto it shifts up before 4,500 in each gear anyway.
They also specified running-in the shocks by only using Comfort until 1k miles or so.

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