Forums > General > Learning to drive

LEARNING TO DRIVE
Previous | 12 | Next

Hello all,

Lurked for to long on the forum, and only dipped my toe into a couple of threads since joining, thought it might be time to face the onslaught and post my first topic.

So here we go.

What do you think we could do to improve the standard of new drivers on our roads?

Some ideas that have been discussed for a long time are ideas such as:
Graduated licensing
Increasing the age from 17
Compulsory lessons
Motorway driving
Curfews

There are many more ideas other than these few examples, what are your opinions and ideas on how we can improve standards?

Cheers,

Hookaduck

The reality is that - if you really want to improve safety - you need to make the test tougher so you weed out the barely-ables.

It is surprising how challenging it is when you are asked to give a commentary as you drive.... this should be part of the test to avoid the exagerated-movement that instructors suggest you make to "prove" to the examiner that you are doing something.

There is an argument that the test has to include motorways - but the reality is that they are comparitively safe (stats view).

I am not sure poor standards are confined or even elicited by young/ new drivers.

What's with this new game of just pulling out at a roundabout and hoping the traffic will just stop and let you out?

My personal view/ hope is to start all new drivers in the same car, that by it's design and financing will promote more; awareness and thinking ahead to conserve momentum, looking after it, servicing it......you know all the things we feel passionate about.

--

My Glass is always half full

You're not going to raise the standard of driving unless people either care about their driving or they're taught better and tested more thoroughly.

We should do what other countries do and make the test a lot harder and much more encompassing of the real world. We should also enforce what is taught, people only drive in a silly manner because they haven't been pulled up on it, standards slip and we see more drivers on the road each year who think speed kills but changing their iPod at 40mph in the middle lame of a motorway is perfectly acceptable.

Replace airbag with a big rusty spike.

--

Romantic BDSM

Gloucester's answer to Eddie Jordan

99.4% of people simply see driving as something you can do or you can't, and not something you can either be good or bad at. This will never change.

Everyone trained to Advanced/ROSPA level, retest every 5 years, replace steering wheel airbags with large steel spikes and all other airbags with explosives. Watch crashes decline very sharply.

--

Jobbo said...

Rev is correct, of course

Some interesting thoughts and ideas.

If you haven't already? have a read through of the thread here http://community.evo.co.uk/forums/thread.cfm?threadID=89886

Now, this isn't a dig at anyone. And hands up I have done some daft things when younger. But, do you think that any of the incidents that happened in that thread wouldn't have happened if the Driving Test was harder? Or if motorway tuition was compulsory, or if cars were limited to a certain engine size etc

NotoriousREV said...

Everyone trained to Advanced/ROSPA level, retest every 5 years, replace steering wheel airbags with large steel spikes and all other airbags with explosives. Watch crashes decline very sharply.

Once again, Rev reaches Jobbo levels of correctness.

--

Something witty goes here.....

Jorg Gray Ltd Edition Watch Number : 313631

None of us would last five minutes under that regime - yes, I'm sure we're all good drivers most of the time, but I also bet we take calls, scrabble in the glovebox, watch movies ;) etc like everyone else at least every now and again. Off the high horses now, thank you please.

I think a better test might be a solution. However, hasn't this always been the problem. People are saying that new drivers are the worst, but there are worse drivers out there. Look at people on their phones, putting on makeup, reading a paper or distracted by someone going passed (not all at the same time though ;)).

I think there is a lot of bad press put on new drivers that is not always granted.

--

Nuts on the road

The only my-fault crash I've ever had was within 12 months of passing my test. Go figure.

JL said...

The only my-fault crash I've ever had was within 12 months of passing my test. Go figure.

Was it in the M5 ;).

I'm not saying they're never guilty but they're not the only ones at fault.

--

Nuts on the road

Opel Manta SR BUT had a Weber carb so was probably making 900 bhp or so ;)

JL said...

The only my-fault crash I've ever had was within 12 months of passing my test. Go figure.

12 weeks in my case.

--

Jobbo said...

Rev is correct, of course

All the training in the world won't alter peoples perceptions to driving - its not seen as a skill, more a right, and until that's righted we stand little chance of improving peoples' driving habits imo.

Barry said...

All the training in the world won't alter peoples perceptions to driving - its not seen as a skill, more a right, and until that's righted we stand little chance of improving peoples' driving habits imo.


Amen father Barry

--

Nuts on the road

Most accidents are due to a lack of control.
Therefore the training to drive should develop the ability to identify where are the limits between having and losing control, whereas now it's typically limited to learning how to operate a car and a set of rules (some of which being questionable).
The motorbike test in France could give some interesting directions (it includes a timed slalom with a U-turn, the actual test being randomly chosen between a set of different exercises) - certainly still not enough, but far better than the car test.

--

Pilouil
Citroen C3 1.4 HDI 69.0424 bhp

Unless you can instill the respect that driving requires back in to everyday peoples' minds, you won't get anywhere imo.

I've seen some truly shocking levels of concentration in the past week alone, people clearly don't feel they are in any danger (or are putting others in danger) through their lack of attention - ergo, training just won't get through to them. It'll take an accident to wake them up to the fact that physics still rules when things go wrong.. :?

pilouil said...

Most accidents are due to a lack of control.
Therefore the training to drive should develop the ability to identify where are the limits between having and losing control, whereas now it's typically limited to learning how to operate a car and a set of rules (some of which being questionable).
The motorbike test in France could give some interesting directions (it includes a timed slalom with a U-turn, the actual test being randomly chosen between a set of different exercises) - certainly still not enough, but far better than the car test.

I'd suggest most accidents are due to lack of attention, not control. Looking at our own Governments statistics, most accidents are rear end shunts (driving too close and/or not paying attention) or pulling out without seeing or misjudging the speed of the other vehicle or overtakes that went awry.

This can all be fixed by training and, as Barry suggested, ensuring that people see driving as a skill, not a right.

--

Jobbo said...

Rev is correct, of course

Previous | 12 | Next

Jump to forum: Go

Please contact the webmaster if you have any problems or queries relating to this forum.

MEMBER LOGIN

|
Connect
Company Website | Media Information | Contact Us | Privacy Notice | Subs Info | Affiliate Programme
Our Other Websites: The Week | Auto Express | Custom PC | IT Pro | MacUser | Men's Fitness | Micro Mart | PC Pro | bit-tech | Know Your Mobile | Octane | Expert Reviews | Channel Pro | Know Your Cell | Know Your Mobile India | Digital SLR Photography | Den of Geek | Magazines | Computer Shopper | Mobile Phone Deals | Competitions | Cyclist | Health & Fitness | CarBuyer | Cloud Pro | MagBooks | Mobile Test | Land Rover Monthly | Webuser | Computer Active | Table Pouncer | Viva Celular