Forums > General > Whatever happened to dished wheels?

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO DISHED WHEELS?
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From the Stratos thread.

Are dished wheels just unfashionable, or is there a reason you don't seem to get them any more?
Last production cars I remember with a decent dish to the alloys were the Saxo VTR/VTS and the BMW 6series.

Difficult on anything front wheel drive otherwise you end up with horrible torque steer from the massive scrub radius you'd need.

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Cheers,
Mike

They kill too many pedestrians.

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Speed holes.

Fashion.

Aerodynamics.

Brake cooling.

I think many of the early deep-dish designs were driven by the fact they were using split rims, and it was the only way to get the appropriate width & offsets.

caneswell said...

Difficult on anything front wheel drive otherwise you end up with horrible torque steer from the massive scrub radius you'd need.

'Need'? or end up with?

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Done.

Dan®™ said...

caneswell said...

Difficult on anything front wheel drive otherwise you end up with horrible torque steer from the massive scrub radius you'd need.

'Need'? or end up with?


Need from a packaging point of view, no dish allows you to keep the CV joint near to the wheel centreline.

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Cheers,
Mike

My understanding of scrub radius may be wrong, but what's CV joint got to do with scrub radius; the distance between the point where an imaginary line through the top and bottom balljoint (or top mount and hub mount on a mcpherson strut)hits the ground and the wheel centre line.

You could have an 8 foot wide dish and it wouldn't move the CV, which is attached to the drive flange, not the wheel.

Updated August 16, 2010 at 6:05 PM

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Done.

Dan®™ said...

My understanding of scrub radius may be wrong, but what's CV joint got to do with scrub radius; the distance between the point where an imaginary line through the top and bottom balljoint (or top mount and hub mount on a mcpherson strut)hits the ground and the wheel centre line.

You could have an 8 foot wide dish and it wouldn't move the CV, which is attached to the drive flange, not the wheel.


Outboard the wheel axis of steering rotation needs to be near the CV joint axis though surely?

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Cheers,
Mike

Words rearrange make and these sentence a?

What :lol:

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Done.

:lol:

The axis about which the wheel rotates (when steering not rolling down the road), needs to be close to the axis around which the associated CV joint rotates.

Better?

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Cheers,
Mike

Everyone else said...

Loads of boring science stuff in a testosterone fueled manner, which in it's self is an oxymoron.

Deep dish wheels look sh1te on the wrong car.

Bbs lm's are on of the greatest wheels Evah, particularly on a powerfull rear wheel driver with a massive dish at the back 8)

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A yellow loltus

Thumbob said...

Everyone else said...

Loads of boring science stuff in a testosterone fueled manner, which in it's self is an oxymoron.

Deep dish wheels look sh1te on the wrong car.

Oh yeah like totally, all the geezers down my local talk about kingpin inclination and Ackerman angle to look cool in front of the kids.:roll:

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Done.

Si_ said...

From the Stratos thread.

Are dished wheels just unfashionable, or is there a reason you don't seem to get them any more?
Last production cars I remember with a decent dish to the alloys were the Saxo VTR/VTS and the BMW 6series.

aerodunamics and fuel saving probably has a lot to do with it.

saxo rims werent ever deep dish though, more slightly concave. the bmw e39 could be optioned with 9in wide 'style 5s' like wot i had on my red m3, not sure how late they made them though. quite a few bmws not all that long ago have pretty wide dishes, z3m, e36 m3, e46 m3 csl wheels have quite a concave face.

the e60 19in spider wheels have an awesome deep centre, although i wouldnt really class them as deep dish as to me that indicates the styled face of the wheel is sat inboard of the rim structure.

probably a style thing too, deep dish wheels often look visially smaller as the centres, hence spokes are smaller. push the centre out to the edge of the rim and you can make them a couple of inches longer visually stretching the wheel to make it look more in proportion to the arch.

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cheers,

Harry

Too many old sheds.

dish!

Dan®™ said...

Thumbob said...

Everyone else said...

Loads of boring science stuff in a testosterone fueled manner, which in it's self is an oxymoron.

Deep dish wheels look sh1te on the wrong car.

Oh yeah like totally, all the geezers down my local talk about kingpin inclination and Ackerman angle to look cool in front of the kids.:roll:

I am enjoying the science bit. Can we have a diagram? ;)

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