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MUNDANE CARS WITH DIFFERENT DRIVING PROFILE
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Settle a discussion I'm overhearing in work. A colleague of mine has a manual 2.0 TDi Bluemotion golf (I think it's a 16 reg).

It's manual, and doesn't have any adjustive dampers or anything like that. It does have different driving profiles (eco, normal, sport, and individual).

I have an idea, but what do these different profiles do? A quick google has only led me to some god-awful forum posts, with no hard evidence :x

Pretty sure that would suggest he does have adaptive dampers. Only Gowf I have driven with those was the GTD though so may be marketing waffle that just relaxes boost on the turbo or similar.

They change the engine map, throttle response, traction and stability control, steering response etc. It also changes the sound in the R. If he had adaptive dampers, it would change those too.

The easy way to see the full list is to go into the Individual mode settings.

Updated February 14, 2018 at 1:25 PM

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NotoriousREV said...

They change the engine map, throttle response, traction and stability control, steering response etc. It also changes the sound in the R. If he had adaptive dampers, it would change those too.

The easy way to see the full list is to go into the Individual mode settings.

there does seam to be a huge variation in what they do, on the OH's car the only noticeable thing is the steering gets a bit heavy, in my car its totally transformed from an easy to drive and vaguely-ish comfortable car into an utter lunatic

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Existence is pain ...

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NotoriousREV said...

They change the engine map, throttle response, traction and stability control, steering response etc. It also changes the sound in the R. If he had adaptive dampers, it would change those too.

The easy way to see the full list is to go into the Individual mode settings.

So is the car actually quicker in sport mode? That seems to be the crux of the discussion.

I can confirm it doesn't have adaptive dampeners. My car has these profiles too, and also doesn't have adaptive dampeners.

GK1985 said...

NotoriousREV said...

They change the engine map, throttle response, traction and stability control, steering response etc. It also changes the sound in the R. If he had adaptive dampers, it would change those too.

The easy way to see the full list is to go into the Individual mode settings.

So is the car actually quicker in sport mode? That seems to be the crux of the discussion.

I can confirm it doesn't have adaptive dampeners. My car has these profiles too, and also doesn't have adaptive dampeners.

No it's not quicker, it just changes the curve the actual throttle opens at for a given amount of pedal travel. Basically a steeper line from rest.

I drive my vRS in Sport mode, but with the DSG knocked back to normal (because otherwise I'd be driving everywhere revving the tits off it 2 gears lower than is necessary, as VAG seems to this this is what "sporty" means) because I like the weightier feel to the steering and artificial anti-derv noises. It also changes the way the headlights respond to speed and weather.

I can also choose "sporty" air conditioning too, but fvck knows what that means.

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Tim

Skoda Octavia vRS. Ducati 748 Biposto. BMW R1200RT SE. SERV Norfolk Rider. RoSPA Tutor.

_Tim_ said...

GK1985 said...

NotoriousREV said...

They change the engine map, throttle response, traction and stability control, steering response etc. It also changes the sound in the R. If he had adaptive dampers, it would change those too.

The easy way to see the full list is to go into the Individual mode settings.

So is the car actually quicker in sport mode? That seems to be the crux of the discussion.

I can confirm it doesn't have adaptive dampeners. My car has these profiles too, and also doesn't have adaptive dampeners.

No it's not quicker, it just changes the curve the actual throttle opens at for a given amount of pedal travel. Basically a steeper line from rest.

I drive my vRS in Sport mode, but with the DSG knocked back to normal (because otherwise I'd be driving everywhere revving the tits off it 2 gears lower than is necessary, as VAG seems to this this is what "sporty" means) because I like the weightier feel to the steering and artificial anti-derv noises. It also changes the way the headlights respond to speed and weather.

I can also choose "sporty" air conditioning too, but fvck knows what that means.


it points the jets upwards to give extra downforce.

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Cheers

Rich

_Tim_ said...

(a) No it's not quicker.

(b) It just changes the curve the actual throttle opens at for a given amount of pedal travel. Basically a steeper line from rest.

(a) That's what I thought.

(b) Come again? So foot to the floor in either mode is the same?

Mines an auto, and I too feel your revvy pain when it comes to Sport mode :lol:

Some cars do work the turbots harder so will be quicker.

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How about not having a sig at all?

So glad we've cleared this up :lol:

Rich B said...

_Tim_ said...

GK1985 said...

NotoriousREV said...

They change the engine map, throttle response, traction and stability control, steering response etc. It also changes the sound in the R. If he had adaptive dampers, it would change those too.

The easy way to see the full list is to go into the Individual mode settings.

So is the car actually quicker in sport mode? That seems to be the crux of the discussion.

I can confirm it doesn't have adaptive dampeners. My car has these profiles too, and also doesn't have adaptive dampeners.

No it's not quicker, it just changes the curve the actual throttle opens at for a given amount of pedal travel. Basically a steeper line from rest.

I drive my vRS in Sport mode, but with the DSG knocked back to normal (because otherwise I'd be driving everywhere revving the tits off it 2 gears lower than is necessary, as VAG seems to this this is what "sporty" means) because I like the weightier feel to the steering and artificial anti-derv noises. It also changes the way the headlights respond to speed and weather.

I can also choose "sporty" air conditioning too, but fvck knows what that means.


it points the jets upwards to give extra downforce.


Disables, for want of a better word, the air con compressor under full acceleration.

GK1985 said...

_Tim_ said...

(a) No it's not quicker.

(b) It just changes the curve the actual throttle opens at for a given amount of pedal travel. Basically a steeper line from rest.

(a) That's what I thought.

(b) Come again? So foot to the floor in either mode is the same?

Mines an auto, and I too feel your revvy pain when it comes to Sport mode :lol:

B) yes. Off throttle is off, full throttle is still full. The 'sport' map just changes the curve so where the standard map might be quite gentle for the first 1/4 of the pedal travel and then linear up to full throttle, the sport model may give 90 of the throttle range within the first 2/3rds of the pedal then flatten out at the far end. They can also add a lag to the response which helps pass certain drive by emission and noise tests.

Similar to putting a smaller pulley on the throttle of a car with a throttle cable. It wouldn't make it open any further or give any more power, it would just make it feel more responsive.

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cheers,

Harry

Too many old sheds.

My golf is faster in sport than eco :D

_Tim_ said...

It also changes the way the headlights respond to speed and weather.

That's an interesting one - do you need less visibility if you're going slowly?

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Wow was I impressed

Jobbo said...

_Tim_ said...

It also changes the way the headlights respond to speed and weather.

That's an interesting one - do you need less visibility if you're going slowly?

A wider beam pattern that narrows as you speed up.

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Tim

Skoda Octavia vRS. Ducati 748 Biposto. BMW R1200RT SE. SERV Norfolk Rider. RoSPA Tutor.

GK1985 said...

A colleague of mine has a manual 2.0 TDi Bluemotion golf

Commiserations.

It's utte lay pointless in a lot of cars and as has been said is normally a different throttle map or gearbox map.

A big selling point of the ML was how big a difference each setting was.

Comfort - good for lumpy fields, anything off road and if you want a bit more clearance. Far too soft and wallowy on the road, we nearly never use it.

Dynamic - it changes suspension height and damper pre-load depending on speed and throttle position. Used most of the time and quite well judged. Handles nicely but never feels too hard or too soft. When driving like a wally on B roads it does get a bit behind where it needs to be though and is never quite firm enough.

Sport - chassis really well tied down, far too firm for most driving, gearbox too keen to drop 2 or 3 gears at once but great when having a play. When at speed on the motorway or fully loaded we use it as it feels more planted and will take a very aggressive steering input without going silly.

BUT, to go from comfort to sport takes the airbags about 10 seconds to set the height so despite the damper, gearbox and throttle maps changing instantly it takes a bit for the airbags to catch up.

On standard coils, an equivalent ML was pretty rubbish to drive.

I remembeR a MK5 Astra having a sport button and all it did was make the throttle a nightmare to modulate when parking, it made no positive difference :lol:

I think even our 1.7TD Astravans has the button too 8)

Dave!

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Makes enough of a difference in my E class to use it (but admittedly, the differences are minor)

Comfort - Limo mode - for bumbling along when you're not in any particular hurry

Sport - suspension is firmer, accelerator response is sharper, gears held a little longer, changes down a little quicker etc.

Sport+ - suspension and accelerator as Sport but more gear changes. "Manual" gears work better in this mode but could be psychological

Eco - for driving in snow or when you're running out of Diesel. :lol:

Sport is default for me...

Updated February 14, 2018 at 3:41 PM

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People once said...

"You're right Dinny"

My Tracer has three ignition modes and as already said, all they do is alter the aggression to the initial throttle inputs, yet still I see owners banging on about how much more powerful it is in A mode :roll:

The GSXR does actually have a rain mode that caps power at 100hp, which is rather laughable as it does nothing to curb the power curve up to that point, so you're still faced with a fairly serious amount of power and torque up to that point. Ergo, I tried it once in the rain, and ever since have left it in full fat mode (and just used common sense in throttle application.. how old fashioned of me).

Broccers_ said...

My golf is faster in sport than eco :D

It's not.

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Strong Broo Racing

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