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NEC - SLOE GIN
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Don't drink and drive, kids [(c) Robbie] :D

Does anyone make sloe gin? I've always liked it but never knew where to find sloes until now. This year there appears to be an abundance of them ripe early as well, so I have harvested nearly 7lb of them from one of the bushes in my new garden already.

I have a couple of demijohns being delivered today, and have a few litres of gin ready for use. But I think I'm going to start with a single bottle just to test it, before commencing the volume production; they're all in the freezer currently.

My stock of gin to use is from Aldi (cheap, bought because it gets good reviews and actually tastes quite nice in a simple G&T). I also bought a bottle of their small batch sloe gin at the same time to try (I'm a big fan of Gordons' sloe gin) and it's not as nice as I'd hoped; it has a bit of an anti-freeze whiff. I'd stick to Gordons if you just want to buy it rather than make it, it's the same price per litre currently (£14 for 700ml at Tesco).

Any sloe gin tips gladly received. I'm going to put about 350g into a 1l bottle with about 150g of sugar and top up with what should be about 500ml of gin for my first go.

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Wow was I impressed

The top tip I read was not to put the sugar in at the outset. You should allow the natural sugars in the sloes to be fully absorbed into the gin first. You need only add sugar to taste when you feel the sloes have done their job.

Here's the Sipsmith guide: https://sipsmith.com/how-to-make-the-perfect-sloe-gin/

Never made it myself, but a colleague gave me a bottle of his home-made stuff which was delicious :)

He said that giving them a bit of a shake every few days helped the flavour infuse. He would decant into old tomato ketchup bottles, which were quite a nice size.

Cheers, Rich

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_ said...

Plus I'm the biggest cvnt out there, so that helps.

Swervin_Mervin said...

The top tip I read was not to put the sugar in at the outset. You should allow the natural sugars in the sloes to be fully absorbed into the gin first. You need only add sugar to taste when you feel the sloes have done their job.

Here's the Sipsmith guide: https://sipsmith.com/how-to-make-the-perfect-sloe-gin/

I've also seen criticism of their method - which I note omits any proportions, despite saying that initial measurements are an elementary mistake :lol: I'm not going to overload mine with sugar; I'm going to stick to about half the proportions I've seen elsewhere, since I don't want it to be too sweet.

There's a forum dedicated to sloes :shock: - Clicky

Updated October 11, 2017 at 10:29 AM

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Wow was I impressed

The shake every few days is all I would mention. My other half made some and bunged Gin in the bottle, then the berries then topped up with sugar then shook every few days and left for yonks. One of the wee bottles is still kicking about.

I believe Brambles can also add a nice flavour.

Watching with interest, I bought a big 5 litre glass jar with tap last year to use for making sloe gin in but never got round to it. Plus no one in my family (me included) drinks gin much so I usually put my 1 hour of annual hunter gatherer lifestyle to good use collecting chestnuts - which should be due for collection this weekend :lol:

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How about not having a sig at all?

Don't like gin, but sloe vodka is lovely :D

My first batch had about three times as much sugar as needed and was like a syrup. :lol:

Huge supply at my Grandads if anyone wants a trip to suffolk to collect some...

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cheers,

Harry

Too many old sheds.

My auntie made amazing sloe gin! Presumably just cheapnand nasty Gin works ok?

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I used to be confused and now I'm not so sure.

I'm assured cheap gin works fine because you're not after the flavour of the gin, really. Paint stripper qualities wouldn't be appealing though, so I've tried to stick to stuff which has decent reviews despite being cheap.

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Wow was I impressed

Will have a look at Aldi, who's olive oil is very good as well so I understand :lol:

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I used to be confused and now I'm not so sure.

Foz said...

Will have a look at Aldi, who's olive oil is very good as well so I understand :lol:

My wife would choose it over her usual Tanqueray London Dry Gin.

Jobbo said...

Swervin_Mervin said...

The top tip I read was not to put the sugar in at the outset. You should allow the natural sugars in the sloes to be fully absorbed into the gin first. You need only add sugar to taste when you feel the sloes have done their job.

Here's the Sipsmith guide: https://sipsmith.com/how-to-make-the-perfect-sloe-gin/

I've also seen criticism of their method - which I note omits any proportions, despite saying that initial measurements are an elementary mistake :lol: I'm not going to overload mine with sugar; I'm going to stick to about half the proportions I've seen elsewhere, since I don't want it to be too sweet.

There's a forum dedicated to sloes :shock: - Clicky

Fair 'nuff. My parents make loads every year so I've never had to bother myself - hence I've no idea what works :)

Ooh, good luck! I was thinking of doing this myself this year, but haven't got round to it yet.

Let us know which recipe you use and the final verdict (hope it's not - buy Gordon's Sloe gin)

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Cheers,

Ian

I'll bump this thread when I have learnt something - it's a bit of a slow process I suspect :lol:

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Wow was I impressed

Musical accompaniment for the process:

Your link text

Jobbo said...

Don't drink ....

....and yet the thread title seems to be saying the opposite... :P

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Wales Meet
*****

Dan Webster "Your car actually sounded quite good from up there"

First attempt: an empty 700ml Gordon's sloe gin bottle seemed apt. About 180-200g of sloes half filled it. I measured out 100g of granulated sugar but that looked a lot so only tipped in about 60g. Filled up with the Aldi gin - just over 500ml at a guess.

The sloes came out of the freezer so would have been impossible to prick- but the skins didn't look broken. I gave them a bit of a bash with a rolling pin but since they were frozen it made no visible impression. So I gave them plenty of vigorous shaking both before and after the gin went in. The colour had already started appearing before I went to bed. Update in a couple of weeks.

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Wow was I impressed

When it comes to tasting, my advice is to very carefully pour a very large measure into a suitable container and down it very quickly without concentrating on the taste itself.

I stumbled upon this method via a process of trial and error but I will claim that doing this seems to make each subsequent tasting far more palatable.

I use that method with the Cillit Bang and Toilet Duck.

Aldi sloe gin is much nicer with tonic than on its own, but the colour is way too pink. Gordon's version still wins.

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Wow was I impressed

Raspberry gin is quick and easy to make. Ready to drink in four weeks. To help make a clear drink you can strain it through a cafetiere.


Word of warning though - eating the remains at the bottom of the cafetiere can result you waking up the following day bolt up right of the sofa with a massive hangover and memory loss ..... Apparently ....:lol:

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"Fire up the quattro!"

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